Hello dear web surfer,

Welcome to 2016! The update of your browser is too old to display a correct and complete version of the POPOUT website that is optimized for the latest versions of web browsers (Firefox, Chrome, Safari and Internet Explorer from version 10). Please update your browser to experience all the features of the magazine and live with us an outstanding experience ;)

The Orange Pop team

en fr Search Menu

Interviews

3 questions to Jessica Easto, the author who drew the portrait of Elon Musk through her quotes

The 3 questions - January 18, 2017

In Rocket Man: Elon Musk In His Own Words, scheduled for release on Valentines Day, Jessica Easto offers us a portrait of the visionary celeb entrepreneur: a compilation of 100 of his quotes from interviews, speeches, and articles.

Orange Pop: How did you get the idea to make this collection of quotes from Elon Musk ?

J.E: The publisher where I work, Agate Publishing, has a series of books called In Their Own Words. Each book collects the quotations from top entrepreneurs and business leaders around the world. We have books the focus on Steve Jobs, Oprah Winfrey, Jack Ma… I thought a book focusing on Elon Musk would be a great addition to the series. I wanted to learn more about him and how he thinks. His choice to pursue these highly improbable endeavors sets him apart from other innovators. In short, his causes seem noble and his success seems improbable. That’s enough incentive for me !

Moreover it’s particularly interesting for Musk to get this treatment. He is known for correcting journalists who, in his view, twist is words or report the facts wrong. He must be hypervigilant of this kind of thing because he is competing against very powerful interests. Also, one of the way he tries to combat misinformation is by explaining things to journalists and the public in as clear of a way as he can.

O. Pop: How did you collect, select and organize all these quotes ? Are some unpublished before ?

J.E: Essentially, I read, listened, and watched everything I could get my hands on. This amounted to hours and hours of audio and video. I focused more on videos and audio recordings of public appearances. As I mentioned, Musk has talking points that he tends to repeat, and his fans can likely recite them almost word for word. I wanted to include those since they seem to represent the foundations of his worldview, but I also include quotes that fans may never heard before. All of them come from sources that are available to the public, but may be lesser known. I organized the book into 10 chapters by subject, including “Learning and Logic”, “Environmentalism and Sustainable Energy”, “Life Lessons”… There are more than 200 quotes in all.

O. Pop: Precisely, what do his quotes and sayings say about him ? Is he really like his reputation, a visionary engineer and a genius entrepreneur ?

J.E: I think his quotes reveal that he is a highly rational, skilled, and principled businessman. People tend to be skeptical of his self-proclaimed mission to ensure a positive future for humanity because 1) that doesn’t sound rational and 2) people tend to think such a claim is pretentious or that it couldn’t possibly be as selfless as it seems. But, after spending hour upon hours listening to Musk speak (from his PayPal days to the present), I’m convinced that he certainly wants to change the world for the better through his companies (and in many ways, he already has) and that guides his business decisions.

Very few business leaders understand the nuts-and-bolts of their products as well as Musk does at Tesla and SpaceX. He believes deeply in his missions, which I think helps him keep up his rigorous work responsibilities. It will be fascinating to see how he continues to innovate the manufacturing sector, especially car manufacturing in the United States. Although he is fabulously wealthy, money doesn’t seem to motivate him in the way it might others, which is an unusual quality for entrepreneurs, at least in the United States.

elon-musk-interview-scientifique

© Jessica Easto

 

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer

3 questions to Artur Sadlos, the legendary illustrator of space’s weirdest life forms

The 3 questions - January 11, 2017

With Conceptverse: Mooeti, Polish artist/illustrator Artur Sadlos dreams up worlds of creatures from far-away galaxies based on traditions and iconography of specific African tribes. We sat down with him to discuss his methods and his work.

Orange Pop: When and why did Conceptverse: Mooeti happen?

Artur Sadlos: Conceptverse: Mooeti started more than three years ago. I did a series of a few illustrations, just for fun. I had no idea they’d lead to bigger things. In one of them, there was a mysterious monk-like figure on an alien world. I liked that idea and over the course of a few months and eventually years I stuck to that impression of a lone, mystical traveler wandering a distant and bizarre world.

artur-sadlos-illustration-dessinateur-comics-extrateresstre

Conceptverse Project © 2005-2016 Artur Sadlos

O. Pop: This project shows alien worlds that resonate with a distinctly African feeling. What inspired you to make that stylistic choice?

AS: That seed was planted ten years earlier when I was a student in art school. For my thesis exhibition, I made paintings of the legends of Dogon (an African tribe). They had this wonderful mythology depicting their beginnings involving an alien race from Proxima Centauri. It intrigued me, and resurfaced years later to spawn the whole Mooeti project. Another important factor is my deep admiration for orientalists. I love their paintings depicting old and distant worlds from a traveler’s perspective. There is something magical about looking at something so foreign, so culturally rich and laden with history.

O. Pop: When you draw alien characters, what are the most important details?

AS: Having a solid base for the alien character is important. Like every character, it needs to have a background, a personal history, and a personality. I suggest a specific cultural history by the outfit, technology or personal belongings. When creating alien biology, it’s essential to really understand biology here on Earth, then change it enough to be weird but believable. And don’t forget purpose. It’s not only about cool-looking appearances (well, sometimes it is): the alien’s role is important too. Is he a monster or an ally, a noble from an advanced race or funny alien dog? Once you answer this question, you can create believable aliens using the design language of our world so it’s easily understood by the general public. The key is understanding how our world works and using that knowledge to make something new.

artur-sadlos-interview-illustateur-extraterrestres

Cross my heart – © Artur Sadlos is an earthling

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer

3 questions to Eric Dupin, founder of dronestagram

The 3 questions - January 04, 2017

On the subject of digital, Éric Dupin is a walking encyclopedia. If you take all his cyber know-how and set it aloft to take aerial photos, well, the sky’s the limit! The founder of dronestagram sat down with us to talk about flight and new tech.

Orange Pop: How did you know drones and aerial photography was the next big thing?

Éric Dupin: I’m very interested in new technologies, and much of my other job, Presse-Citron blogger, is devoted to this. On a personal level, I’ve always liked gadgets and digital devices. The first remote-controlled helicopters arrived on the market in 2008 and could fit in the palm of your hand. I knew this technology would literally take off when they added embedded cameras to the aircraft. And that’s what got me into drones.

As far as technology and its uses, I immediately saw the connection between drones and the smartphones of the early 2000s; at first, only the geeks go for them, but sooner or later the general public hops on board and everyone’s got one. In the last two years the same thing has happened for drones. I realized that with an array of high-performance machines on the market, it’s now possible for everyone to take really unusual photos. On-board cameras allow for close-up photography of generally inaccessible views. The close-up and the wide-angle panorama are the two major assets of drone photography.

Other uses will be adopted by the general public, like dronies, selfies taken from above. Already available, these flying machines can be remotely controlled by your smartphone, which can also display the image the drone camera’s viewfinder is “seeing,” to check the photo before clicking.

O. Pop: You organized the Dronestagram Photo Contest in collaboration with National Geographic, a magazine that often leverages the beautiful (those gorgeous images of nature) for worthy causes (environmental protection).

ED: The first year Dronestagram was operational, we wondered how to attract more visitors to our site. We came up with the idea of a photo contest, but that meant partnering with an international heavyweight in the photo business. National Geographic loved the idea. It provided the magazine with unusual and beautiful photos for their magazine and provided us with a high-visibility contest.

The contest took place in the spring of 2014. This year, we are aiming to get tens of thousands of entrants, both drone professionals and amateurs. At a reasonable cost, anyone can take some pretty eye-popping snaps.

One of our slogans is, “Some want to change the world. We simply want to change the way people look at the world.” For example, you can get up close and personal with the earth’s flora and fauna without being invasive. Drones are discreet and can’t be heard or seen from 30 or more meters away, so they don’t frighten animals. That said, more and more parks in the USA are outlawing drones in their airspace.

O. Pop: Are you considering extending the reach of dronestagram to other platforms?

ED: This spring we’re releasing a book entitled Dronestagram, published by a prestigious English art-book house. It’ll contain the 200 or 300 most beautiful photos on our site and will be available in English, German, Dutch, and French.

We’re also raising funds to develop a smartphone app that would enable users to upload photos and videos directly from the drone to the dronestagram site and to social media. The idea is to anticipate and prepare for the sector’s full potential, i.e. for the new generation of superlight drones, better quality cameras, tightened security, and enhanced-reality options. This is just the beginning; unimaginable wonders await.

eric-dupin-dronestagram-photo

Éric Dupin and Dronestagram Photo Contest 2014 – The winning photo

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer

5 questions to the editors of jeuxvideo.com

The 5 questions - December 28, 2016

Jeuxvideo.com is the most-visited French-language gaming webzine, the site of reference for enthusiasts of all stripes. The editorial staff reviews new releases, breaks down trends, tests products, and offers loads of rankings and video. Four of them took time out of their busy days to answer our questions and help us compile a Best Of 2016!

Orange Pop: In a scant two months, Pokemon Go was downloaded 500 million times in over 100 countries. The craze kindled by this new off-the-couch-and-into-the-world style of gaming has tapered off in recent weeks, so the question is: was this a summer flash-in-the-pan or a game-changing innovation in entertainment?

 Julien Rateau, mobile project manager: Pokemon Go is a bonafide planetary phenomenon that took the game out of the console and put it in the real world. You go out and chase those critters in the streets, around your park, everywhere. It really took off during the summer, the July release of Niantic Labs magnifying the global trend. Restricting availability only fanned curiosity around the world to the point where almost everybody downloaded Pokemon GO. Despite the predicted decrease, its popularity continues. PoGO, version 2.0, is set to relaunch the planet. Tough to say after a mere 5 months if it’s here to stay or on the wane: optimists and pessimists abound.

O. Pop: With tens of millions of athletes worldwide and their numbers growing daily, eSports are gaining in notoriety and even going professional. The sums at stake are skyrocketing and investors are pouring money into promoting competitions with global audiences. Many, like NBA player and eSports maverick Rick Fox (Echo Fox), think that eSports are going to “become one of the four major sports in the United States.” Why?

François Aymes, eSport journalist: In recent years, eSports have experienced exponential growth because the serious gaming studios are behind them now. League of Legends has generated huge revenues, as have competitions by Riot Games, Blizzard and Valve, encouraging many more developers to hop onboard. With deep pockets and massive audiences, eSports are attracting more and more investment. With the backing of a connected generation, electronic games may well just become as popular as basketball in a matter of years, though its success will surely be measured differently. After all, most of its profits are internet driven, generated and collected.

O. Pop: A virtual reality revolution was predicted for 2016 but didn’t happen. Why? Are the major studios ready and are they willing to open up this new sector?

Yohan Bensemhoun, virtual reality journalist: Indeed 2016 was to be the global VR revolution. The tech is ready and the fans are thirsty for it, but the price tag is prohibitive. With a PS4 starting at €530, it’s still for the 1%. Gamers hoping for the VR experience for under €400 are still waiting, but developers are betting on it and developing the tech. The revolution is coming, it’s just dragging its heels.

O. Pop: What were the major trends (virtual universes, plot lines, and game decors) that emerged in 2016’s crop of video games? And why so?

Yohan Bensemhoun: Drawing big trends from the rich field of video games is no easy feat. Globally in 2016, open world games seem to have a bright future with the magnificent Dark Souls 3, the very good Watch Dogs 2 and the excellent DLC Blood and Wine by The Witcher 3. And 2016 remained a winner for classic football video games like PES and FIFA. First-person shooter games are dominated by CoD, Battlefield and Titanfall. Between console tech innovations, PCs and traditional games going for face-lifts, two sectors stood out: mobile gaming has come of age (Pokemon GO, and the excellent Star Wars Galaxy of Heroes, Naruto Ultimate Ninja Blazing and Final Fantasy, Brave Exvius and Mobius Final Fantasy), and the fledgling success of virtual reality on four brand headsets.

O. Pop: Finally, your Top 5 games for 2016 (all categories)?

Frédéric Goyon, editor-in-chief: This year, the editorial staff is unveiling Best Game 2016 rankings in a special show called Pixels d’Or“. For Best Game of the Year, there are 3 nominations: Dark Souls III, Dishonored 2 and Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End. If we were to add two games, they’d be Forza Horizon 3 and Inside, and that would get us up to a Top 5:

  1. Dark Souls III(PS4, Xbox One, PC)
  2. Dishonored 2(PS4, Xbox One, PC)
  3. Forza Horizon 3(Xbox One, PC)
  4. Inside (PS4, Xbox One, PC)
  5. Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End(PS4)
interview-site-jeux-video-bestof2016

Julien Rateau alias Silent_Jay, François Aymes, Yohan Bensemhoun , Frédéric Goyon

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer

3 questions to Lawrence Arcuri, the man behind the digital yule log

The 3 questions - December 21, 2016

It’s a 50-year-old tradition in The States – Americans plop down on the sofa to watch “The Yule Log, one long stationary camera shot of a fire burning in the hearth, accompanied by a 4-hour soundtrack (no commercials) of Xmas carols & songs. A look back over this odd-ball yuletide tradition with the guy who knows it best, Lawrence Arcuri.

Orange Pop: How did you discover “The Yule Log“?

Lawrence Arcuri: I first saw it in 1972 when my family moved from Ohio to New Jersey. I was fascinated, and watched the whole program that year, and I’ve watched it every year since. I even kept the faith from 1989 to 2001, when the show was cancelled because it brought in no advertising revenue, by playing a VHS cassette recording of it “to keep the flame alive.” Funny thing is, I began a collection of Xmas music because the tape had deteriorated from being played so many times, and when the tape went kaput in 2006, I was able to restitute it thanks to my collection. To celebrate the program’s 50th birthday, I’ve produced a new 5-hour version of The Yule Log. In my own humble way, I feel like the show’s second father, though I’m lightyears behind original creator Fred Thrower, since gone to brighter pastures.

O. Pop: Why do you think The Yule Log has become so popular in the USA?

LA: It all started in New York, where fireplaces are rare. It enabled New Yorkers to cozy up around the hearth they didn’t have. But it caught on nationwide for two reasons. First, the fire is great – a hearty, crackling, perfectly filmed blaze. The second reason is the soundtrack of magnificent Xmastide music. It’s the combination of these two elements that explains its success. A superb fire without the music wouldn’t cut it, as wouldn’t the reverse. But as is, “The Yule Log” is perfection. I watch it like I do films, from beginning to end, and I can sing all the songs, in order.

O. Pop: Why is it so important to broadcast this show every Xmas Eve?

LA: It’s that special moment when you can sit down and take off your shoes. The cars are parked, the cookies baked, gifts bought, and there’s really nothing left to do but relax and soak up the glow and bask in the holiday spirit with your loved ones. That’s what Xmas is all about and that’s what “The Yule Log”’s all about. Modern life is so hectic you have to take the time to slow down and enjoy life. And it’s a moment of delicious anticipation, too. Some claim the best part of Xmas is looking forward to it. It’s the same for “The Yule Log”: many spend the year looking forward to that special moment

lawrence-acuri-feu-cheminee-yulelog

Lawrence Arcuri and his vinyl Xmas music collection © theyulelog.com

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer

3 questions to Quentin Delobelle, Orange France’s kitsch-loving dandy

The 3 questions - December 14, 2016

Every year, our buddies over at Orange France Communication dream up an ad campaign for the holiday season. This year they’re rocking the theme Christmas XXL, a multimedia kitsch bonanza, hashtag #BigNoël. We sat down with Quentin Delobelle, Creative and Communications Director and the brains behind these hilarious spots.

Orange Pop: How did you come up with this theme?

Quentin Delobelle: I was inspired by that Hollywood blockbuster “Deck the Halls”. Neighbors were trying to out-do each other in decorating their houses for the Christmas holidays. But there are other influences: when you’re in communications, you have to be in-step with the times. All over France at Christmastime, you see houses decked to the nines with a gazillion lights, Santas, reindeer, snowmen… Some cities like Bourges and Colmar even hold competitions, awarding prizes to the most resplendent dwellings. In the States, there’s a TV show called “The Christmas Light Show”. We’re surfing the yuletide deco wave and bringing you some of the most extravagant examples via smartphones, digital devices and drones.

O. Pop: Some of the “Big Noël” spots are full-bore kitsch, like the one with the Cheesy Guy. What pushed you and your team in this unusual direction?

QD: There’s something of a public attention deficit when it comes to advertisements these days; people just ignore spots where you basically just say, “Buy our product. It’s the best.” If the consumer doesn’t find the ad amusing or interesting, she won’t pay it any attention. One response to this is the new brand-style content ads. We see our spots as a variation of this new theme of life-hacking ads (How-to ads). Obviously the theme of Big Noël is an open invitation to outrageous. For example, we had the PSG’s top football stars yodeling in Christmas sweaters. That’s how I see kitsch: it’s a way of flirting with bad taste by going completely over the top.

O. Pop: What is it about Christmas that brings out the kitsch in everybody?

QD: I think it has to do with the general tone of excess that the holiday season indulges. Christmas has a down-home quality that lends itself to kitsch, an all-out-year-end-bash vibe that gives everyone carte blanche to toss the regular day-to-day rules right out the window. After all there’s something comforting about kitsch and camp. People need to unwind a little at Christmas and let their hair down, the most propitious conditions for kitsch. For example, there’s something of the cozy security blanket about the hand-knit Christmas sweater. And some of the PSG football stars in the Orange ad actually asked if they could keep the Xmas sweater they wore in the spot. But we won’t say which ones!;)

quentin-delobelle-kitsch-publicite-noel-bignoel-orange-france

© Quentin Delobelle, Creative and Communications Director at Orange France

 

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer

3 questions to Marie Paindavoine, PhD candidate in cryptology for Orange Labs

The 3 questions - December 07, 2016

Specialist in cryptology (keeping information secret from prying eyes and ears) Marie Paindavoine is a talented scientist, and she, for one, thinks microscopes are cooler than Barbie dolls!

Orange Pop: Do you see any change in attitudes towards women in the field of science?

Marie Paindavoine: I think there’s less discrimination against women than there used to be, but there’s still a lot of inequality. In my lab, men outnumber women, which is weird because the gender mix for science PhD students is about 50-50. Some of the age-old prejudices still hold, though I don’t see that much of it in my work environment. Over the course of my career, I’ve heard sexist remarks here and there, but don’t see that much bald gender discrimination of the girls-can’t-handle-the-math variety.

O. Pop: How do we get girls interested in science and how do we get them to see science as a career for them?

MP: When I was a junior in high school and chose science as my concentration, I found myself in classes with way more boys than girls, about 4 or 5 girls in a class of 35. And while the discrimination may not have been explicitly condoned, the educational system reinforces the structural message that science isn’t for girls. We need to heighten awareness of the problem and get teachers at all levels to present science as a gender-neutral discipline. Men have got to pitch in, too. Girls have to be told to disregard this kind of lame outdated sexism, and boys need to be taught to take girls interested in science seriously. Schools need to revamp their MOs for both girls and boys.

O. Pop: What do you think of the scientific toys and games out there?

MP: Unfortunately, they’re almost always aimed at boys. I’ve a funny Christmas story: my mother was a journalist, and her works committee gave gifts to their employees’ kids. I always wanted a present from the boys’ catalogue because that’s where the robots, microscopes, and other interesting toys were. The girls’ catalogue was full of dolls… Frankly, a microscope beats a Barbie any day!

marie-paindavoine-cryptologie-docteur-orange-labs-scientifique-femme

© Marie Paindavoine, PhD student in cryptology at Orange Labs

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer

3 questions to Julien Nonnon, the artist who created The Kiss in Paris

The 3 questions - November 30, 2016

Le baiser (The Kiss) is the title of a famous painting by Klimt, sculptures by Rodin and Brancusi, a photo by Doisneau, and now another artwork of the same name joins this illustrious list: an ensemble of mesmerizing mural projections by street artist Julien Nonnon. A digital virtuoso, he projects hundreds of photos of couples kissing onto Paris’s world-renowned façades.

Orange Pop: How and when did you get the idea of projecting images of kissing couples onto Paris’s façades?

Julien Nonnon: One of my inspirations for this project is a line from a poem by Alfred de Musset in his Poésies Nouvelles: “The only true language in the world is that of the kiss.” I wanted to create a veritable ode to love, using the universal language of the kiss. The idea had been rolling around in my head for a few years when Paris’s new Fashion & Design Museum commissioned me to come up with a project for the city’s annual all-night art event, La Nuit Blanche, in 2016. The theme of the 2016 Nuit Blanche was “Love”, the perfect opportunity to execute this idea I’d been incubating.

O. Pop: Can you walk us through the stages this artwork went through from conception to unveiling?

JN: I wanted to reverse the traditional roles of artist and viewer, transforming the spectators into the project’s actors, so I launched a call for entries on social media, inviting any and everyone to collaborate on this. I received hundreds of emails from couples eager to participate. After filming them in the studio, I crisscrossed Paris with my team and my video projection equipment, reconnoitering suitable walls and façades for the projections. I consider myself an image craftsman: my work is all about the intersection of my images, architecture and urban features. I’ve created many artworks using this artistic process, combining street art, cinemagraphic installations, digital art and video mapping.

O. Pop: What is your intention? What effect are you trying to achieve with this urban pastiche technique?

JN: The goal is to invite Parisians to re-appropriate their city: “To make love great again”. When I project my images onto Paris’s walls, people come up and talk to me about them. They are intrigued by this mixture of videography, performance art, and urban architecture. They often snap photos of these ephemeral works with their smartphones. One anecdote sticks out in my mind and really sums up the spirit of my project #le_baiser: a spectator invited me up to her apartment so I could take a picture of the artwork from her balcony. Her apartment had a perfect view of one of my projections with, in the background, the shimmering scintillating Eiffel Tower, lit up with thousands of blinking lights.

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer

3 questions au Sosh Big Air

The 3 questions - November 23, 2016

The first ever Sosh Big Air was held in downtown Annecy (France) this autumn. A look back on this fab funky event and the people who made it happen (big ups to our buddies at Sosh :D).

 

Gaylord Pedretti, the man in charge of Sosh Big Air

Orange Pop: Where did the idea for this event come from?

Gaylord Pedretti: We all love skiing and snow sports but the problem is that they take place in the mountains. Paradoxically, while these are the ultimate spectator sports, not many fans make it up the mountain to watch them. We wanted to hold a spectator-friendly freestyle event right downtown, before the ski and snowboard season opened. Annecy was the obvious choice since it’s home base for so many alpine sports in France. The idea of attracting so many top-notch freeskiers for some frosty urban freestyling was just too tempting. It was a huge challenge that we met with an emphatic, “Yes we can!”

O Pop: How tough is it to hold this kind of event right smack in the middle of a city?

GP: It’s a huge undertaking. It took 3 weeks, massive cranes, and a lot of heavy construction. The ramp was 45 meters, higher than the buildings around it. What with France’s heightened security measures, we had to convince the authorities to allow the event to take place. But truth to tell, I like doing difficult things: after all, no one’s ever pulled something like this off.

O. Pop: What kind of rapport does this kind of event create between city-dwellers and snow sports enthusiasts?

GP: I remember talking to a granny watching the event through binoculars. I complimented her on her kit and she said: “I’ve never seen anything like this and I’ll surely never see anything like it again!” The president of Annecy’s football team even post-poned their match so his team could come watch Sosh Big Air! And to get everyone into it, we had the crowd do the judging and designate the winners. It got everyone involved.

gaylord-pedretti-organisateur-sosh-big-air

Gaylord Pedretti © David Malacrida

Kevin Rolland, freestyle skier

Orange Pop: How are ramp skiing and alpine stunt skiing different?

Kevin Rolland: Skiing on a ramp is weird because you have no contact with the snow until you hit the slope. One minute you’re an urban dude in sneakers, the next you’re a pro rider. Pretty bizarre.

O. Pop: This Big Air rig is the largest of its kind ever built. How do you train for this event when there’s nothing like this ramp anywhere in the world? How do athletes deal with the fear factor?

KR: There’s always some fear during the first run because it’s a leap into the unknown. Plus, skiers are used to alpine scenery, so a backdrop as incongruous as a center city spooks them a bit. But once they get into it, the fun takes over and they have a ball.

O. Pop: The Sosh Big Air ramp is in the heart of Annecy. As an athlete, how does this urban venue change your mental approach?

KR: In general, I like skiing around a little bit before I hit the course. It warms me up, relaxes me, and gives me the feel of the snow. At Sosh Big Air, you just jump into it and you’ve only got 50 meters of downhill to get used to it before the jump.;)

kevin-rolland-sosh-big-air-ski-streetsport

Kevin Rolland © Louis Garnier

 

Sandy Alibo, Director of Sponsoring at Sosh

Orange Pop: What brand image advantages do sponsors get out of backing an event like this?

Sandy Alibo: Almost 20,000 spectators came to Annecy to see Sosh Big Air over its two-day run. And we had 4 million hits’ worth of visibility thanks to coverage in 213 media of some form or other, 20% of which were TV stories that totaled 2 hours and 30 minutes. That’s the equivalent of 1,500,000 euros of advertising! (source: argus). Web coverage was very strong, with 54 million impressions on social media (source: radarly).

O. Pop: Why organize an event like this in the heart of a major French city?

SA: Sosh is constantly on the lookout for things that are bold and unusual. Big Air-type events are commonplace worldwide but have never been held in France. We wanted to put on a show that brings together the world of international freeskiing and the general public. That’s where the idea of hosting the event in an urban setting came from. It offers brands maximum visibility as opposed to the small turnouts alpine competitions attract. The challenge was to find the perfect spot to host this world-class extravaganza.

O. Pop: Will this lead to similar events in the hearts of other big cities?

SA: Next year, our star event is the Sosh Freestyle Cup in Marseilles, June 2017 (one of the official competitions collectively referred to as the BMX Freestyle Park World Cup), the Sosh Highlight in Paris, May of 2017 (a skate photo and video contest) and the Sosh Urban Motion in Paris, October of 2017 (BMX photo and video contest).

Sosh is now a major promoter of freestyle sporting events. We contribute to the global strategy of competition-hosting, teaming up with Orange Events Solutions to furnish cutting-edge technology, HD WiFi, social wall, and livestreaming. The result is an unforgettable digitally enhanced experience!

sandy-alibo-sponsoring-sosh-france-streetsport-rider

Sandy Alibo © Sandy Alibo

 

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer

3 questions to Sean Hargreaves, production designer and lead concept artist of Hollywood’s futuristic cities

The 3 questions - November 16, 2016

He conceived the space city Yorktown in Star Trek Beyond and did design work on films like Batman Forever, The Fifth Element, Ghost in the Shell and Jurassic Park: The Lost WorldSean Hargreaves is the master architect of the city of the future.

Orange Pop: How do you conceive and design a city of the future for the cinema? Is it purely a matter of imagination?   

Sean Hargreaves: Anything designed for a film is designed because of the script. You then think about how far in the future you need to design. Then once that is established you need to find an aesthetic, which means you need to see what kind of ‘look’ is appealing for the film. Hopefully you can design something original. Personally I love minimalism, and minimalist designs, but for films it needs to have fantasy or the audience will be bored. I base all my designs on reality first and I try to make them as realistic as possible.

O. Pop: What are the similarities between cities like Coruscant (Star Wars, JJ Abrams), the Los Angeles of Blade Runner (Ridley Scott) or Yorktown (Star Trek Beyond, Justin Lin)?   

SH: First, these cities are huge. Especially Coruscant, which is a planet city. I think the dream has always been to have personal vehicles that land on platforms attached to the buildings. But definitely Blade Runner was a huge influence, with the different levels of opulence. I also think Moebius and O’Bannon’s The Long Tomorrow comic is a big influence on some of these designs, including The Fifth Element.

O. Pop: Do you think that cinema is a good way to disseminate ideas and models for the city of tomorrow?   

SH: Yes, I really think science fiction cinema shows a possibility of where we are going or where we can go in the future. It can give us hope. It can, and has, predicted the future. Cell phones, GPS and car screens are examples. I think the only 2 things left are flying personal cars and teleportation.

sean-hargreaves-marvel-studios-designer-concepteur-ville-futur-interview

The Senior Concept Designer conjuring up visions of tomorrow’s metropolis © Sean Hargreaves

Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Stumble
  • Mail
  • Fermer