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This week's feature

Street Art Goes Digital

“Art is everywhere,” declared the artist known as Ben. Street art is a ubiquitous part of our urban environments, a ray of creative sunshine that brightens our commutes, strolls, and errands. And this urban art genre has recently taken off, thanks to new technologies that enhance the viewer’s experience with interactive sensor-based technologies.

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So issue #77, Street Art Goes Digital, will whisk you away to the four corners of the globe, for a tour of the coolest murals and outdoor art on the planet:

  1. The awesome live projection mapping by Beyonce
  2. #InstawalkRio – when digital elevates street art
  3. The artist who created The Kiss in Paris
  4. Gif-iti, the digital streetart in the palm of your hand
  5. Urban light painter may just provide a little inspiration
  6. The international organization who mixes graffiti art and tech
  7. The best light projects by street artistes

Fasten your seatbelts, destination pop culture!

As Banksy put it:

All you need is a few ideas and a broadband internet connection. For the first time, the sacred bourgeois preserve called art has become the domain of the people. So let’s do something with it.

Beyoncé, the Queen of live projection mapping

Music - November 30, 2016

Beyoncé does more than fill stadiums and belt out her hit-parade, she puts on grandiose shows with cutting-edge digital technologies that take our breath away.

One of her most memorable performances was Run the World (Girls) during the 2011 Billboard Music Awards. The critics unanimously hailed it as one of the Queen B’s greatest triumphs. It mixed special effects and mind-blowing choreography in an epic sound & light show. She pulled it all off with live projection mapping, a novel technique that allows artists to project images onto the stage and around the hall in amazing new configurations. The audience was wowed by a kaleidoscopic vision of a stage full of Beyoncés, sometimes hundreds of them. These projected images, identical real-time versions of the singer, created the illusion of Bey back-up singers, or dancing multitudes of herself filling the stage. To close the performance, she was joined by a host of dancers in a dazzling flourish of sparkling motion!

In 2013, the superstar surprised us again, performing at the Super Bowl, surrounded by… herself! And in 2016, she turned to holograms again, projecting them during the TIDAL X benefit concert.

With each new video or tour, the undisputed Queen of R&B has shown that she’s also the Queen of Tech. No one puts on a (digital) show like her. Can’t resist watching her 2011 Billboard Awards performance again:

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#InstawalkRio – when digital elevates street art

The infographic - November 30, 2016

During the Summer Olympics this year, Instagram teamed up with some of Brazil’s most talented street artists on a project that showcased the city’s finest murals. The result is InstawalkRio, a self-guided art tour featuring 58 outdoor works in and around Olympic Boulevard and the Lapa district. Five acknowledged masters of the street art genre were commissioned to paint new works especially for the Games: Acme, Luiz Zerbini, Raul Mourao, Rita Wainer and Vik Muniz.

instawalkrio-infographie-instagram-streetart-rio-de-janeiro

 

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3 questions to Julien Nonnon, the artist who created The Kiss in Paris

The 3 questions - November 30, 2016

Le baiser (The Kiss) is the title of a famous painting by Klimt, sculptures by Rodin and Brancusi, a photo by Doisneau, and now another artwork of the same name joins this illustrious list: an ensemble of mesmerizing mural projections by street artist Julien Nonnon. A digital virtuoso, he projects hundreds of photos of couples kissing onto Paris’s world-renowned façades.

Orange Pop: How and when did you get the idea of projecting images of kissing couples onto Paris’s façades?

Julien Nonnon: One of my inspirations for this project is a line from a poem by Alfred de Musset in his Poésies Nouvelles: “The only true language in the world is that of the kiss.” I wanted to create a veritable ode to love, using the universal language of the kiss. The idea had been rolling around in my head for a few years when Paris’s new Fashion & Design Museum commissioned me to come up with a project for the city’s annual all-night art event, La Nuit Blanche, in 2016. The theme of the 2016 Nuit Blanche was “Love”, the perfect opportunity to execute this idea I’d been incubating.

O. Pop: Can you walk us through the stages this artwork went through from conception to unveiling?

JN: I wanted to reverse the traditional roles of artist and viewer, transforming the spectators into the project’s actors, so I launched a call for entries on social media, inviting any and everyone to collaborate on this. I received hundreds of emails from couples eager to participate. After filming them in the studio, I crisscrossed Paris with my team and my video projection equipment, reconnoitering suitable walls and façades for the projections. I consider myself an image craftsman: my work is all about the intersection of my images, architecture and urban features. I’ve created many artworks using this artistic process, combining street art, cinemagraphic installations, digital art and video mapping.

O. Pop: What is your intention? What effect are you trying to achieve with this urban pastiche technique?

JN: The goal is to invite Parisians to re-appropriate their city: “To make love great again”. When I project my images onto Paris’s walls, people come up and talk to me about them. They are intrigued by this mixture of videography, performance art, and urban architecture. They often snap photos of these ephemeral works with their smartphones. One anecdote sticks out in my mind and really sums up the spirit of my project #le_baiser: a spectator invited me up to her apartment so I could take a picture of the artwork from her balcony. Her apartment had a perfect view of one of my projections with, in the background, the shimmering scintillating Eiffel Tower, lit up with thousands of blinking lights.

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Gif-iti by the artist Insa

A picture says it all - November 30, 2016

Put “gif” and “graffiti” together and you’ve got London artist Insa. His artistic method consists of painting a wall, then repainting, it over and over again, making important changes each time. He takes a photograph of each version to “save” it, then splices them all together to form Gif-iti, an infinite loop of graffiti art. In reality, his works are not kinetic: they aren’t in perpetual motion, but he found a digital way to make them into continuously morphing artworks that art enthusiasts can explore from the comfort of their couches.

His gifs can be download and shared, turning ephemeral murals into permanent artwork!

Open School North, Portland 2015: 5 weeks of work and 40 participants to create Isra’s most complex Gif-iti to date © gif-iti.com

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With nothing more than a simple flashlight and a camera, become an urban light painter!

Shine at parties! - November 30, 2016

Don’t know what to do with those long winter nights? This urban light painter may just provide a little inspiration.

A little bored? Insomnia? Want to Win Friends and Influence People? There’s a new genre of art that may be just the thing for you – light painting. The artistic process consists of using a light source (flashlight, laser, even a lighter) to draw shapes and patterns, then capturing them with a photograph. The moving light appears against the fixed background of urban decor. While the equipment you use is pretty basic, the effects can be prodigious. Witness the technical prowess and unbelievable creativity of Jadikan, a French artist who focused international attention on light painting, turning it into a bona-fide genre of street art. It was born of his twin passions, art and urbex – the exploration of vacant lots, buildings, and places that are generally off-limits.

The result is intriguing photographs of the enchanting hidden face of cities you thought you knew. Warning: discretion recommended and flash photography forbidden!

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The American artist and designer James Powderly

Who's who - November 30, 2016

This American artist, designer, and engineer teamed up with Evan Roth to found Graffiti Research Lab, an international organization of street artists, new tech tinkerers, and computer whizzes of all stripes for the mutual benefit of graffiti art and new tech. Their goal? “Provide graffers, street artists and new tech fiends with open source technologies for urban creativity”.

All their successes are in-house products and they post everything they make online for public use. GRL France won considerable acclaim recently during a year-long residency at Paris’s media tech hub La Gaîté Lyrique, in 2013. Among their inventions: the Near Tag Quality, Print Ball, tag E.U.L.E. SMS and Portable Tag.

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TOP 5 light projects by street artistes

Gimme 5 - November 30, 2016

Certain street artists use light as an artistic medium the way other artists use paint. Here are 5 projects we think deserve some limelight!

1. Graffiti Mapped. Australian artist Sofles used video mapping in Melbourne to create a huge graffiti art mural that comes alive at nightfall. It’s an exhilarating experience for those lucky enough to see it in real life, down under.

2. Animated Wall Projection. With a battery of video projectors, Brazilian artist VJsuave sends cartoon characters roaming all over the city walls. His digital creations are particularly poetic, playful and colorful.

3. Avatar’s Riot. This is a project by videographer and digital inventor Pierre Amoudruz, who turns the city into an art studio, inviting residents to participate in digital urban artworks. His tools? Image projection, interactive video mapping and creative audio.

4. Light Painting Wifi. This project by the trio of Timo Arnall, Jorn Knutsen and Einar Sneve Martinussen consists of making visible the web of WiFi networks that thread through our cities. They use the technique of light painting to reveal the dense urban skeins of our WiFi radio waves.

5. This is Street art 2.0 ! La Havane. Photographer Philippe Echaroux went to the Cuban capital to project his visual creations onto the mythic city’s walls. His aim was to express in projected words and images what Cubans themselves couldn’t say in public.

 

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Kaki King’s show: a pleasure for the ears and the eyes!

Stories - November 30, 2016

What if music could be translated into images?

This is the dream come true of composer and guitar virtuoso Kaki King. Coming from New York City, she has imagined a musical performance, based on projection mapping with her instrument: The neck is a bridge to the body…

In addition of playing guitar, she actually creates about half of her concerts’ visual content, providing a new artistic experience: the artist and the instrument make one body, spreading lights and sounds to the audience. And it’s pretty fantastic!

On December 18, she’ll play in Brooklyn, NYC. It will be the right place to be, don’t miss her 😉

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David Bowie’s hologram visited a square of Edinburgh

Stories - December 01, 2016

Digital can be extremely inspiring when one wants to pay a tribute to someone we love.

On November, the American artist Tony Oursler set up a special event to honor the memory of his friend, David Bowie, who passed away in January 2016. Named “The influence machine”, the show took place in Edinburg (Scotland) where the artist used the Victorian lights of the George Square for an immersive outdoor sculptural experience. The famous singer appeared shaped as a hologram, as if he was alive once again…

Famous for his art videos, Tony Oursler likes to transform urban spaces. His revolutionary show is described as “a holographic model of human desire and dread” and gave the city of Edinburgh a very strange and ghostly atmosphere…

To know more information about this event, check out this link

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Digital Art is poetry with Dandy punk

Stories - December 02, 2016

Some artists definitely have a digital native mindset. Designer and creator for the “Cirque du Soleil” (Paris, France), Dandy Punk is one of them. The self-named “Knight of the Magickal Light”, is well known for his play The Alchemy of Light, where he interacts with strange characters thanks to some live projection mapping techniques.

He recently made a private projection in an empty building in Las Vegas. Using lights and shadows, his artwork mixes digital and reality with kids bricks and other stuff, to bring his lightly puppet to life. For sure, a show full of poetry in a place full of… (what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas). In addition, he is working on a new project called #Heartcorps. He sends some images on his Instagram account and his Facebook page to keep up with the evolutions of this project. We can’t wait to see the result!

Check out a snippet of his artwork with the Instagram video below:

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The Earth is a visual artist

Stories - December 05, 2016

What show can be more wonderful than Earth itself? If digital art is stunning, the universe seems to have nothing to learn from Humans even with a computer. We can admire these natural artworks thanks to the NASA which reveals the beauty of our planet and space through daily posts on several social networks. From Earth or Moon photobombs, to solar material and change of season.

This passion for earthly artworks is shared by one of the ISIS  astronauts, Thomas Pesquet, who left Earth with the Poxima mission for a 6-months space exploration. Since he’s been up there, he’s been sharing with us on the floor his most beautiful shots taken from the Station. Among them, the Frenchy likes to show the biggest towns in the world, literally highlighted at night, as if they had been digitally painted. Lately, he asked Twitter the name of one of these cities and few followers found the right answer: it was the capital of India New Dehli.

Now we have just one wish: going there and admire the Earth paintings through our own eyes 😉

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Future wife and Skrillex unveiled a digital art installation for Complex con

Stories - December 06, 2016

Art has no borders and can lead to wonderful collaborations. Several talented artists, the plastic artist Takaski Murakami, the design collective “Future wife”, the singer Skrillex and the artists DaveandGave teamed up during the Complex Con, a special festival of pop-culture, in Long Beach, California on November 5 and 6.

They presented an oversized globe called “Baburu”, a creation that looks like a giant balloon. When you touch it, the balloon reacts by producing images and sounds. “Future wife” conceived and designed the globe, Takaski Murakami created the images while Skrillex produced the music. At last, DaveandGave was in charge of audio interactivity. Good job guys!

According to “Future wife”, “digital can be a tool to regain childhood’s imagination”. The design collective is also interested in things we can touch and play with. They aim at helping people to play thanks to this kind of creation.

Another great creation you might like to test is the Hyperthread, invented by DaveandGave. This a series of silk cocoons that creates sounds at the same time you’re touching it. Impressive! 😉

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See you next week!

To be continued - November 30, 2016

Next week, toys will actually teach you girls scientific skills!

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