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Interviews

Margaret Dean, co-president of Women in Animation and General Manager for Stoopid Buddy Stoodios.

The 3 questions - May 24, 2017

At the head of the biggest stop motion studio in Southern California, Margaret Dean is also an ardent defender of women in the animation sector. She tells us about their situation and role in the production and creation of animated films, their image and their representation on the screen, but also the actions of Women In Animation in their favor.

Orange Pop : How was your organization, Women In Animation, born and why ? What are its actions and objectives ?

Margaret Dean : Women in Animation (WIA) was founded over 20 years ago as a way to bring together a handful of women who had ventured into the industry. The purpose of the organization was to give support to women who often found themselves alone in meetings, on teams and in studios. Two years ago WIA announced a call to action : 50-50 by 2025. We want 50% of creative roles across the Animation industry to be filled by women. All of our programs are focused on this goal. In the last two years, women have gone from 20.63% to 23.22% of the creative staff in Los Angeles (The Animation Guild 839). The increase is good but still not enough to hit our 50-50 mark in 8 years.

In addition to offering programs that develop female talent, such as mentoring, skill building workshops and screenings, we have an advocacy strategy which drives us to approach the issue from both sides : working with the industry and all the major studios to open the doors wider, and with women to be more confident and push their ambitions.

O.P. : How has the image and representation of women in animated films evolved from the first great Disney classics to recent productions, more progressive or just more faithful to reality ? Can we say that the Japanese animation was a pioneer in this matter (the Studio Ghibli in particular) ?

M.D. : There have been great strides in the representation of women and girls in Animation. Looking at Snow White and Sleeping Beauty next to Judy Hopps (Zootopia), it’s plain to see. But hearing the Geena Davis Institute‘s researchs, the overall number of female characters still does not reflect the reality of the gender breakdown of the population. And as she has said many times, if an audience sees a world on the screen that is predominantly male, then the message understood is that women don’t count.

However, we know that studio folks are working hard on rectifying this misrepresentation. My expectation is that we’ll see a huge improvement over the next few years. At the core of WIA’s mission is the belief that having more female and diverse voices heard will make animation and our culture in general richer, more entertaining and more lucrative.

Miyazaki is absolutely a pioneer. Most of his lead characters are girls, spunky, adventurous, thoughtful and clever girls at that. I discovered his films in the 80’s when I was raising my children. I was so relieved to have for my daughter as well as my son, something to watch that gave them an alternative view. It’s unfortunate that more parents aren’t aware of his films. But I wouldn’t give the pioneer medal to all Japanese animation. There is an awful lot of Anime that undoes all the good that Miyazaki did. Perhaps if there were more women directing and writing Anime, we’d see a great art form elevated.

O.P. : Behind the screen, what can you tell us about the representativeness of women and parity in the studios of creation and production of animation ? Even today, what explains why women are always a minority in this sector ?

M.D. : Our research showed that animation programs across the country were predominantly women. This last year, California Institute of the Arts (Cal Arts) announced that their animation program was 75% female. But it turns out that women are only getting about 23% of the creative jobs. Interestingly, they get 65-70% of the production management jobs. Women are not ending up in the place where their voices will be heard but rather in a role where they foster and support the vision of others.

The risk-averse culture leads to the same people getting jobs over and over again. A lot of money is at stake and people don’t want to take a chance on someone newer. Also there is still the misconception that boys won’t watch stories with girl leads and women don’t know how to tell boy stories. We can’t forget, that this industry is still controlled by people of an older generation (mine), who have old ideas of what women can and can’t do. But there is something different with the upcoming leadership. Most younger men that I meet completely embrace women in creative roles and see women as a great untapped resource.

And then there are the women themselves with issues of confidence and being driven enough to go after a position no matter what. It is contrary to the socialization of most women to be aggressive in any way especially on behalf of themselves. And that’s what it takes to be successful in the creative industry. You need to be talented, tough and driven. WIA’s work is to remind them that they deserve to have their voices heard, and support them through the challenges and hardships by building a community of people committed to a greater diversity of animated films, television, shorts, games, VR/AR and VFX

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Margaret Dean, real-life Wonder-Woman: activist and co-president of Women In Animation

 

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3 questions to Bernard Payen, past-member of the jury at Cannes : “Those 10 days have been an enchanting interlude”

The 3 questions - May 17, 2017

In 2015, Bernard Payen, filmmaker and director of programming at Cinémathèque Française, was part of the jury of the Golden Camera (Caméra d’Or) in Cannes. It is an award for the best first film.
We came to him to know a bit more about what life as a Cannes juror is like.

Orange Pop: What is a typical day for a Cannes juror?

Bernard Payen: Being a juror at Cannes is experiencing the festival under the best possible circumstances, being able to enter the theater and have a reserved seat, even when you’re late. They wanted us to watch the movies together as much as possible. The pace is quite intense (that year, the selection had 24 films), which is even worse if you want to attend other screenings than those you are obliged to go to. The hardest part is not talking about the movies during the festival, so just imagine meeting your friends or the people you know and they start asking about what you’ve seen and liked. But our position forbids any talking about the movies (at least those in competition for the Golden Camera)! It’s really hard not being able to share what you really liked and what you didn’t. And it only takes one conversation for rumors to start.

O. Pop: Tell us about the deliberations. Is it difficult to find common ground between all the jurors?

B.P: Our president of jury Sabine Azéma asked us to discuss about the movies right after the screenings. Obviously our instant reactions could change from day to day, which they had. I don’t think I’ve ever talked about movies more than with the jury. With most juries, you watch the movies together or separately then you meet up once or twice to review everything. That wasn’t the case with ours. Our daily passionate and rigorous conversations between people who were very different from each other have helped us see the light. That’s why when time came to deliberate, our decision pointed quite naturally towards César Augusto Acevedo’s La Tierra Y La Sombra.
O. Pop: What’s your best memory of your Cannes experience as a member of the jury?

B.P: There’s not just one. There was a real solidarity between the members of the jury, a very distinctive one, which was kind of unexpected as we didn’t know each other for the most part. Those 10 days have been an enchanting interlude and to this day we’re still in touch and share lots of colorful memories, including one during a boat trip to the Lérins Islands that I think we’ll all remember for the rest of our lives.

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Bernard Payen, juror at Cannes in 2015 © courtsdevant

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Kris A. Truini, director, youtubeur and cinema color expert

The 3 questions - May 10, 2017

Just like the color orange which has many meanings in cinema, Kris A. Truini has a multi-faceted resume! On Kriscoart, his Youtube channel, the young director dissects the cinematographic techniques and the psychology of colors.

Orange Pop : What motivated you to make videos that explain the technical aspects of films, the psychology of colors during the editing, lightning and photography proceesses?

Kris A. Truini: For as long as I can remember I loved telling stories. I started this Youtube channel when I was in high school and made a few horrible videos which gave me some views and new subscribers. Later, by starting to attend Full Sail University in Florida I realize the power of a platform like Youtube can have when used by a young filmmaker that is trying to get his work out.

Contrary to my expectations people there weren’t very interested in helping others make shorts or videos, instead there was this odd sense of competition that led to everyone doing their own thing. I hated that but I had to adjust to it so I started making videos and tutorials that I could do on my own, without crew and actors necessary to make a film. From there the feedback was incredible and for the first time in my life I felt accepted and wanted. This having brought personally me a lot, I continue to make videos to help others.

O. Pop : You’ve done many videos about the use of colors and their meaning, but also a short film titled “Orange”. So what represents the color orange in film? What does it stand for exactly

K.A.T.: Orange is a color that stand out easily and therefore can have several different meanings, but typically we associate positive feelings and emotions to it. It can show warmth, enthusiasm, excitement but also represent freedom, creativity and success.

Colors can take on many meanings but it’s important to know that they also stimulate us in different psychological ways. It also has been proven that orange color in particular affect us in very positive ways. It can also create physical effects such as a heightened sense of activity, stimulated mental activity, increased socialization, oxygen supply to the brain, contentment and enhanced assurance. Orange color also contributes to happiness, confidence, and understanding.

O. Pop : Which directors use orange the most and the best? In what movie?

K.A.T. :The color orange is probably the most common color used in films and is often used to portray moments of happiness and bliss. Its popularity in the color spectrum is also in part due to the current blockbusters’ look. A warm orange is complementary to a cooler tone such as teal. This is a pleasing combination since these two sets of colors sit opposite to each other in the color wheel, so creating a contrast rich composition as well as offering many ways to show separation between a subject to element from the rest of the scene.

Orange color can have many meanings, without having a single fixed connotation. Some artist such as Francis Ford Coppola in The Godfather used the color orange and the orange fruit itself as an omen of death. Alfonso Cuarón paid homage to this in his film Children of Men where the color orange and the fruit are seen right before the death of a major character.

Colors can be powerful and mostly a great tool when understood and used correctly. In filmmaking, they can become another layer of meaning that can guide the audience through the story, they can even heighten certain feelings, elements or moments in film, or simply just focus in the viewer’s attention to a particular part of your composition.

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3 questions to Jean-Max Méjean, the Almodóvar specialist: “he used to say that he was Andy Warhol with a dark wig”

The 3 questions - May 03, 2017

Pedro Almodóvar is considered a one of a kind director with an incomparable talent, and although many forget it (or just don’t know about it), it’s within the cultural movement of movida that the filmmaker has carved out such a unique identity. Jean-Max Méjean, Almodòvar French specialist, tells us everything about the movement.

Orange Pop: Pedro Almodóvar is described as a child of the movida. But what exactly is the movida?

Jean-Max Méjean: La movida is a cultural movement that emerged suddenly after the death of Franco in the mid 70s. From the very beginning, this movement was a drastic departure from Franco’s Spain, which was very Catholic and full of restrictions. Madrid’s movie store didn’t have the movies Pedro was interested in. So he had to go to France to watch them. That was the time when Salvado Dalì said that Perpignan was the center of the world because a lot of Spanish people were crossing the borders to watch more subversive movies in France. Movida has had a huge impact on Almodòvar’s early work like The Labyrinth Of Passion or What Have I Done to Deserve This?. It was. It was like a revolt of some sort, a little punk, anticlerical and fascinated with the transgender identity, which is a recurring theme in the filmography of Almodóvar.

O. Pop: What role did Almodóvar play within the movida?

J.M.M: At first, he was linked to the movement through music. Let’s not forget that he started out as a musician with his band Almodòvar & McNamara. That’s why he can be compared to Emir Kusturica who’s also a musician and a director. In The Labyrinth Of Passion that was released in 1983 – which marks the very beginning of the movida – he interprets a song that is rather symptomatic of its time. The lyrics go “Voy a ser mama” which means “I will be a mother”. He says that he wants to have kids. That too is a recurring theme of his filmography

O. Pop: In time, has his role evolved in any capacity?

J.M.M: Soon enough he became the self-proclaimed pope of the movida. People compared this movement to New York’s underground scene – for better or for worse – so Almodòvar jokingly used to say that he was Andy Warhol with a dark wig. Rumor has it one day, at a party in Madrid, Almodòvar met Warhol who said to him : « Im happy to meet my brunette doppelganger ». I would have loved to be there on that night

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Laurence VEYNE, head of communication at Greenpeace France

The 3 questions - April 26, 2017

Orange Pop: For a long time, celebrities from the music, cinema, fashion or entrepreneurship have been getting involved (to various extents) with ecology, preservation of animal species, forests, resources,  and so on.
Do you think their involvement; speeches and overall actions have become a necessity to
environmental awareness and to respond to this major challenge?

Laurence VEYNE: Celebrities definitely have a role to play in alerting the general public about global issues, protection of the environment and the climate or the defense of fundamental human rights. Thanks to their media visibility, they can shed light on subjects that are usually forgotten and allow to reach audiences that are not traditionally those of the associations. They are complementary to the awareness raising work carried out by organizations via actions on the web, social networks or the media.

However, this work can be a double-edged sword for celebrities, as for associations: the collaboration has to be about an issue that means something deep and personal to both parties so that they all benefit from it.A famous spokesperson could harm the reputation of the association if their words or behavior went against what the NGO that they support stands for.
On the other hand, social networks would also point be the first to point out the potential inconsistencies, exposing the artist to criticism, as it has been the case in the past.

O.Pop: As an international NGO for the protection of the environment, accustomed to high-profile campaigns, how do you convince celebrities to join you and help the planet (like Marion Cotillard addressing the deforestation in the Congo and more recently Ludivico Einaudi’s performance for the “Save The Arctic” campaign?)

L.V.: We usually create lasting collaborations with celebrities; they are based on a genuine need for them to get involved. Ever since the start of her career, Marion Cotillard has always been a true ecologist so she has accepted quite naturally to support our campaigns, especially those about the preservation of forests, a subject she feels strongly about. Tryo, Mélanie Laurent and Lambert Wilson also support our actions and have gotten involved with oceans preservations works too. Furthermore, we must adapt to their schedules and make sure we’re not going against what they put on display in their career.
We’re very open to any form of collaboration with artists, as long as their motivations are heartfelt and they are in agreement with our demands, our values and our no-violence policy.

O. Pop: Does popularity mean greater responsibilities ? Is using you success, your fame, your wealth and your talent for an environmental cause fundamental in this day and age ?

L.V.: Yes, something like that. It is important that every one contributes somehow to building a better tomorrow, a « greener » and more peaceful one. Having said that, that commitment has to rely on profound and genuine convictions to be legitimate and credible. At Greenpeace, we try to raise awareness for ecology for the largest amount of people, hoping that they will do the same one-day. It is also the case for celebs that have what it takes to bring our actions to the next level, if they are willing to take the time to understand, invest and fight when it comes to environmental issues.

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Laurence VEYNE, head of communication at Greenpeace France © L.V.

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3 questions to Bhautik Joshi, AI specialist for the next Kristen Stewart movie

The 3 questions - April 19, 2017

Using Neural Style Transfer technology, the engineer at Adobe Bhautik Joshi has worked with Kristen Stewart on sequences for her artificial intelligence-redesigned movie? He gladly answered our questions:

Orange Pop: You’ve recently co-wrote an article about artificial intelligence in the arts with Kristen Stewart. How did this collaboration come about?

Bhautik Joshi: In 2016, I took an interest in this technique called Neural Style Transfer, which allows redrawing an image in a precise style of painting using a network of neurons. On paper, it’s a very cool technique but it can also be used to tell stories in several different ways. So I experimented with it by making a video that takes elements from 2001: Space Odyssey in the style of Picasso’s cubist period. The internet went crazy over the video and Kristen contacted me through her producer. She was working on her first film as a director and wanted to redesign some scenes from it in the style of a piece she had painted. So we worked together on some video footage and we wanted to write an article to crystalize it all. To sum up, this article isn’t really about how this new technology works but rather how to get something creative out of it

O. Pop: How important can artificial intelligence be for art in the future ?

B.J: I think IA will play a huge part in art but I don’t know to which extent. When it comes to artists, I see it as more as some sort of companion than replacement. It can’t work on its own. To reach an artistically qualitative result, you have to toy around with what AI puts creates. I do believe that AI is a great way to help an artist start a piece. But he must play around with the final result. I think people should see AI like a tool, or a new kind of brush. I believe it can change many components in society but what will remain is art. Because art is something that is fundamentally human. It’s actually what separates us from most other species

O.Pop : Don’t you think AI could write interesting movies or books in the future ?

B.J: Not really because factors such as authenticity and inspiration are fundamental human traits. Plus, AI needs to be « trained ». It needs a human output before it can do anything. Also it can’t really get a sense of what’s « cool » and what’s « in trend ». But I get that it is fascinating imagining what would happen if a computer could do everything an artist can. I don’t think there’s an answer to that question. The real answer would be way deeper that we can currently imagine

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Bhautik Joshi, AI specialist © Bhautik Joshi/Matthew Almon Roth

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Jason Feifer, editor-in-chief for “Entrepreneur” magazine

The 3 questions - April 12, 2017

A reference in the latest business and corporate world news ever since its creation in 1977, Entrepreneur magazine also has a Facebook page called “Inspiration for Entrepreneurs” which posts on a daily basis tips and quotes… from entrepreneurs.
The magazine’s editor-in-chief Jason Feifer tells us why “entrepreneurs-philosophers “ are so popular.

Orange Pop: How do you explain people’s fascination with entrepreneurs nowadays ?

Jason Feifer: A few decades ago, most people didn’t need to pave their own path. They could just get a corporate job, or a factory job, and work it their entire lives. But now we live in unpredictable times. Our economies are rapidly changing, and our politics seem ever-more dysfunctional. The only way to survive is to think entrepreneurially. Entrepreneurs are the people who are taking control of their lives – building their own companies, creating their own jobs, enacting their own vision. That’s exciting, and it’s also critically important.

O. Pop: Entrepreneurs’ quotations and intellectual traits now coincide with those of great writers, philosophers and artists of all disciplines. Have entrepreneurs become the new thinkers of the Modern Times ?

J.F: I think so, yes. Entrepreneurs build big, impressive things. Through the ideas that they transform into products and companies, they change their own lives, their communities, and occasionally even the world. They have a can-do attitude, and so it’s no surprise that everyone wants to understand how the most successful entrepreneurs think.

O. Pop: According you, what exactly is a good entrepreneurial quote ?

J.F: There’s no one great kind of quote. Often, in fact, the greatest entrepreneurial quotes aren’t all that shocking or revealing. Instead, they manage to crystalize a common-sense idea in a meaningful way. Entrepreneurism can be abstract; it’s not like there’s a manual for how to be inventive, stubborn, and risk-taking. So, I think it’s helpful for people to hear about those qualities in ways that are inspiring and easy to remember.

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Jason Fiefer, editor-in-chief for Entrepreneur magazine © David Rinella

Bonus question : what is your favorite entrepreneurial quote ?

J.F: Reid Hoffman often says that entrepreneurs need to live their lives in “permanent beta”. We must be constantly adjusting and reinventing ourselves. I love that phrase.

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3 questions to Michel Lévy-Provençal from TEDxParis: “First of all, a talk is about telling a story”

The 3 questions - April 05, 2017

As the head of TEDxParis since 2009, Michel Lévy-Provençal has become a household name in the motivational speaking world. That’s the reason why we wanted to pick his brain and talk about how to best organize our ideas.

Orange Pop: How did this project of having TED conferences in Paris come about?

Michel Lévy-Provençal: TEDxParis was born in 2009. A few friends and me had really wanted to have people come up on stage and tell us about their crazy ideas. So I reached out to TED saying that I thought it was unfortunate that we didn’t get this type of conferences in France. By chance, around the same time, TED was launching the TEDx program, a licence which allows people to organize talks all over the round. They asked me to be the first one to hold a talk in Europe, which I did, in Paris. We’ve become the very first “TEDx” conference and the biggest community too.

O. Pop: What are some the difficulties attached to those kind of events?

M.L.P.: In 2009, the format wasn’t as popular; we had to guide our speakers so that they could be impactful on stage. I’ve reached out to people from the theater and self-help industries so that we could come up with a certain methodology that we still use with our speakers. First of all, you must know that a good talk is never improvised. You have to work on it. The structure, the message you want to convey, the different anecdotes you rely on to tell your story. A talk is mainly about telling a story. Also you must rehearse. You can’t go on stage unless you’ve rehearsed at least 3 times. Your introduction has to be super-catchy, unexpected and enticing to grab the audience’s attention. It is the same as far as the conclusion.

O. Pop: How do you think conferences, ideas and TED’s manner of addressing them can change the world?

M.L.P.: TED is all about giving exposure to ideas that are worth sharing. Obviously talking about an ideo on stage for 15 minutes isn’t enough to change the world. Still, it is a hook, a catalyzer, a spark. People in the audience could be like “Wow! Maybe I should try too”, and then be inspired to go further. Based on some positive feedback we’ve come up with a new format called L’Echappée Volée”. Instead of an afternoon, it lasts for 3 days. There are talks and happenings that allow the attendees to experiment the projects and innovations presented on stage. Furthermore, it’s a great way to connect with the attendees, introduce them to those who are trying to make a change and motivate them to start to do so on their own. The next edition of L’Echapée Volée will be on May 12th – 14th.

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Michel Lévy-Provençal © mikiane.com

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Buzzing designer Angelina Pischikova, creator of insect-themed packaging

The 3 questions - March 29, 2017

At creative agency AIDA Pioneer Group, designer Angelina Pischikova has conceived alongside illustrator Anna Orlovskaya an insect-inspired collection of packaging. Created for the CS Electric Group, they’ve already got the whole web buzzing.

Orange Pop: Transform the bulbs into insect bodies. How did you get the idea for this packaging?

Angelina Pischikova: I studied books on physics and the history of the invention light bulbs. Also, inventor Thomas Edison ‘s words that a firefly is an ideal cold light source prompted the idea of comparing the various forms of light bulbs with various insects. The idea to merge an insect with a light bulb belongs first to nature. Just repeat it one to one would have been quite boring.

O. Pop: According you, why is packaging so important today? Also, What are the secrets of good packaging?

A.P: Packaging design is primarily about a sale. In the modern world of abundance of any categories of goods it is important to       differ. To sell your goods you need to convince buyers that it is better than the goods of competitors and will give the buyer exactly what he wants. Good packaging has a thoughtful functional design, it is ecological, pleasant to the touch, and it provides information and attracts the eye.

O. Pop: Do you think people could buy these bulbs especially to have the packaging?

A.P.: Why not! The three sides of the package are folded into one big bug with widely spread wings. In the illustration, there are many details specifically for this package to be considered as long as possible, as for the study of insects in biology class.

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Angelina Pischikova, enlightened designer :)

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3 question to Guillaume Salmon, Public Relations for Colette

The 3 questions - March 22, 2017

As Colette celebrates its 20th anniversary, we got to talk to Guillaume Salmon. As a PR for the shop, he’s in charge of organizing events with the biggest stars on the planet.

Orange Pop: Has Colette always held in-doors events from the get-go?

Guillaume Salmon: Yes. Ever since its opening in 1997, the shop was already hosting events, signings, brand launchings, These kind of events have always been part of our shop’s DNA and they represent a great way for us to communicate on anything and everything we have to offer – through all the designers and artists we get to work with.

O. Pop: When you’re putting together events with the likes of Pharrell Williams or the Odd Future crew, how do you usually handle the influx of fans?

G.S.: Depending on the day and the time slot that are predefined, it is already known if there will be more or fewer people. As a result, security measures are taken accordingly and then we use barriers to manage the flux. Fans queue up in front of the store and we let them in in groups so that they can see the artists, take a photo, get something signed, have a look and eventually buy the store’s products. We are very careful not to have an unmanageable crowd in front of the store. It happened once, when Drake was launching a clothing collection and had come in person to the shop.

O. Pop: In general, what added value these kinds of events bring to the store?

G.S.: This is a common added value because these events also allow artists to leave the music niche, to touch new grounds. They also take advantage of the store’s image. Most of the time, it’s these artists or their managers who contact us, which speaks volume. For us, it makes it possible to attract another kind of clientele and of course generate sales, as it remains the heart of our business. But most of all, these events drum up buzz and communication around the store.

Guillaume Salmon, PR for Colette © Radio Marais

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